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Nanobiology Notes

The series of notes on molecular biology I posted initially to this blog have been moved to a new blog:
Nanobiology Notes
:

Just add water...
Fun with Molecular Origami
Chromosomes: Good things come in very small packages
Protein formation: Codones, Histones and Ribosomes
Life and Ligands
Ion Channels: gates in the cell wall
Enzymes: Come together, right now, over me.
ATP: Power to the people, right on!

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From http://www.hhmi.org/research/investigators/sudhof.h…