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A new type of mathematics





From TEDxMontreal: http://tedxtalks.ted.com/video/TEDxMontreal-David-Dalrymple-A

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John von Neumann: The Computer and the Brain 

Nature article on 2-photon microscopy: Visualizing hippocampal neurons with in vivo two-photon microscopy using a 1030 nm picosecond pulse  (January, 2013 - free online access) by Ryosuke Kawakami, Kazuaki Sawada, Aya Sato, Terumasa Hibi, Yuichi Kozawa, Shunichi Sato, Hiroyuki Yokoyama & Tomomi Nemoto

- David Dalrymple's antidisciplinary, non-institutional science and technology project for digital replication of the functionality (“mind”) of simple nervous systems (“brain”)

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